Unforgettable Peloponnese sailing experience: A week-long adventure

This article describes a week-long sailing trip around the Aegean Sea.

This route is moderately challenging, so it's better suited for experienced captains, but you don't have to be an old sea wolf. Thanks to the Attica peninsula, the winds are mild and the sea is also calm. Compared to the open waters of the Aegean Sea, you can look forward to more favorable conditions. But keep in mind that the weather can surprise you. But let's take a look at all the stops of your journey!

Keep in mind that this is just inspiration for the cruise. Each itinerary must be planned with the current weather conditions and other factors in mind.

Itinerary: Marina Alimos – Aegina island – Hydra – Peloponnese – Monemvasia – Spetses – Poros – Alimos Port
Difficulty: medium
Lenght: a week route (210 nm total)

The port on the island of Aegina.

The port on the island of Aegina.

Day 1: Aegina Island (20 nm)

If you set sail from the Alimos port in Athens, you can reach the island of Aegina on the first day, docking at the Agia Marina bay. For optimal sailing, it's best to go with a north-easterly breeze. When you drop anchor, stay at least 50 m away from the marina and coast. The depth here is 10 m, and the bottom is sandy, which makes anchoring easy. Just be aware that the northwest wind can be unpredictable here. There are various hotels and stores to explore along the seaside.

View of the Hydra island.

View of the Hydra island.

Day 2: Hydra Island (22 nm)

The following day, it is suggested to set off early for the 22 nautical mile journey to the island of Hydra and its eponymous town. There are two options for anchoring: the picturesque old harbour, which is often full, or Mandraki Bay. This location was of great significance during the 19th century Greek revolution as many prominent traders passed through. Once you reach the town's shore, take in the beauty of the area and witness the remarkable sunset.

We recommend that yachts moor in rows two and three at the Mandraki Bay to remain safe and secure while the speed ferries create turbulence in the port. You can tie a line to the shore and use a dinghy to go ashore and explore the area. Mandraki has only a hotel and one restaurant, but if you take a sea taxi from the Old Harbor, you can visit the town and then return to your boat. You can also take a leisurely walk (around half an hour) through the island's landscape for a more leisurely experience. Tourists in Hydra have many activities to choose from, including walking through the small roads and alleys, sampling the local cuisine, exploring the historic aspects of the Town, and partying in the cozy bars in the harbor and in the streets around it.

YACHTING.COM TIP: The isolated island of Dokos near Hydra, which is unpopulated, boasts untouched nature, making it a popular sailing spot. Visitors can take advantage of the peaceful atmosphere by anchoring near the shore and spending the night.

An elevated perspective of the city Porto Cheli, an upscale coastal getaway located on the eastern border of the Peloponnese peninsula in Greece.

An elevated perspective of the city Porto Cheli, an upscale coastal getaway located on the eastern border of the Peloponnese peninsula in Greece.

Day 3: Peloponnese (50 nm)

Next, you will be headed to Kyparissi Bay, located on the Peloponnese peninsula, which is around 50 nautical miles away from Hydra. The journey will be longer, but the scenery is sure to be spectacular. The eastern portion of this peninsula is filled with trees, and the waters are crystal clear, perfect for a dip. If you're lucky, you may even spot sea turtles. The bay itself is almost 2 nm long, with a small harbour located on the north side. From here, you can take a short walk to the south side, where a quaint village awaits you. Or you can take the taxi. You can purchase food and other necessary supplies from the village, and there is a small dock nearby. However, we do not suggest anchoring here due to the waves from the open sea.

Monemvasia, a medieval town with a castle, is commonly known as "The Greek Gibraltar".

Monemvasia, a medieval town with a castle, is commonly known as "The Greek Gibraltar".

Day 4: Monemvasia (21 nm)

The next day you will head south along the forested shores of the Peloponnese to Monemvasia. From afar, you'll see an ancient castle rising on a hill, a breathtaking sight as the rock looks like a mountain peak, connected to the mainland only by a narrow bridge. The harbour can be found to the south. Be careful when entering the harbour as there are unmarked shoals and rocks in the water. However, the harbour is constantly being improved, so hopefully the situation will change soon. 

In terms of replenishing water and electricity, the situation is considerably less pleasant. Water can be found here, but electricity is more rare. The harbour is not guarded, so make sure you secure your boat properly before leaving and don't leave your belongings unattended. There are many restaurants in the village and you can also eat directly at the castle and enjoy an unforgettable view. If the harbour doesn't offer free space, you can also dock at the old wharf by the bridge. However, this place is not as carefree as the harbour as it is exposed to the north wind. This should be kept in mind when anchoring.

The walk to the castle is a magical experience you don't want to miss. You will be walking approximately two kilometres uphill, with the Aegean Sea at your right hand. Some of the medieval houses are very well preserved, others have only their torsos left. However, this combination creates an exceptional atmosphere. The castle breathes a piece of history, provides a familiar view and you can also visit the church of Agia Sofia. Of course, from the top of the hill you will have a perfect view of the wide surroundings.

YACHTING.COM TIP: How to be a good captain and handle every situation with ease? We have compiled detailed information for you!

The buildings situated on the island of Spetses in the Saronic Gulf, which is located close to Athens.

The buildings situated on the island of Spetses in the Saronic Gulf, which is located close to Athens.

Day 5: Spetses Island (36 nm)

It is almost time to go back to Spetses Island. The direction of your journey will be north, so you need to pick your anchorage location based on the current weather patterns. If the wind is coming from the north, it is best to avoid the southern bay of Spetses. If the wind is blowing from the south, or any other direction, it is recommended to anchor in the Old Harbour. However, it can get quite crowded in the Old Harbour and it is not advised to navigate there at night if you are unfamiliar with the area. Alternatively, you can anchor in Zogeria Bay on the northwest side of the island. This bay is suitable for all directions of wind, except north. If you are in a pinch, Porto Heli Harbour is also an option, though it doesn't offer the same traditional architecture and charm.

In any case, try to leave Monemvasia as early in the morning as possible to ensure you reach your destination before dusk.

YACHTING.COM TIP: Sailing is a popular hobby among celebrities as well. Do you know which ones are passionate sailors? Find out here! 

An elevated perspective of the chapel located on the island of Poros.

An elevated perspective of the chapel located on the island of Poros.

Day 6: Poros Island (27 nm)

The next stop on your journey is Poros, a picture-perfect island in the Saronic Gulf. The island is blanketed in lush pine trees and is just off the northern coast of the Peloponnese. You can take a dip in the crystal clear waters of its many bays, but while approaching the harbour, be sure to exercise caution as the Poros canal is quite deep. When docking, you'll need a lot of chain to reach the 3-meter depth of the port. Aside from its beauty, the port of Poros is also popular for its many restaurants and bars and is especially crowded during summer weekends due to its close proximity to Athens.

Sunset in Alimos marina.

Sunset in Alimos marina.

Day 7: Alimos Port (34 nm)

On the last day, you will depart Poros island and head back to Alimos marina. If you would like, you can make a stop for lunch and a swim at Aegina island; the exact spot will depend on the direction of the wind. If the wind is coming from the north, you can visit the bay of Klima or the islet of Metopi, which is close to the western coast of Aegina. Alternatively, if the wind is coming from the south, you can visit the islet of Moni, near the port of Perdika in Aegina. There is also a lovely spot at the northern coast of Aegina, in Vagia, however, this should only be visited if the wind is calm since it provides no protection from the wind. You are expected to arrive back at the home port of Alimos by 5pm, giving you time in the evening to rest and then explore the Athens City Center. The amazing journey is coming to an end!

Reminder: The information given (distances, mooring details, etc.) is for information purposes only and cannot be relied upon completely. Please study the nautical chart before sailing to ensure a safe and enjoyable voyage.

Do you need help choosing a ship or do you have any other questions? Contact me!

FAQs Sailtrip around Peloponnese